Flipped professional learning on Glow⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

In these times, it’s vital to make the most out of the opportunities offered by face-to-face professional learning events. That’s why some event organisers are now  ‘flipping’ some of the learning .

A flipped learning space (eg a Yammer community on Glow) lets attendees engage online before the event; look at pre-event materials, introduce themselves and explain their expectations.

During the event, the conversation can continue with others not at the event, presenters can easily access their materials and you can post suggestions made or resources mentioned.

After the event, the impact can be tracked using a pledges tag and the whole thing can be revisited as an anytime professional learning opportunity as you may have filmed the key moments or presenters.

If you need to reset your Glow details, then see How do I get a Glow login?

If you need help with ‘flipped learning’ we will publish a Handy guide soon. In the meantime, these colleagues  shown below on Yammer will be able to help.


Scottish Engineer Special Leaders Award – Ashley Nicholson⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-ashley-nicholsonJoin us on Tuesday 6th December at 11am for an opportunity to chat to an engineer who can help you as part of this year’s Scottish Engineering Special Leaders Award.

This week’s engineer is Ashley Nicholson. She is the Harbour Master Forth Inner at Forth ports Limited and looks after the navigation service call Forth & Tay Navigation and is responsible for the safe navigation of all vessels to and from the Ports of Grangemouth and the Oil and Gas Terminals of Hound Point and Breafoot. As part of her duties she is involved in civils projects throughout the river and spend large amounts of time managing engineering project from a marine perspective. The latest project is the construction of the Queensferry Crossing which she has been involved with from the very early stages. She was awarded the Scottish Engineering Incorporation of Hammerman award for my involvement in this project.

Sign up and join us live in Glow TV – Scottish Engineer Special Leaders Award – Ashley Nicholson

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Scottish Engineer Special Leaders Award – Ashley Nicholson⤴

from @ Education Scotland's Learning Blog

small-ashley-nicholsonJoin us on Tuesday 6th December at 11am for an opportunity to chat to an engineer who can help you as part of this year’s Scottish Engineering Special Leaders Award.

This week’s engineer is Ashley Nicholson. She is the Harbour Master Forth Inner at Forth ports Limited and looks after the navigation service call Forth & Tay Navigation and is responsible for the safe navigation of all vessels to and from the Ports of Grangemouth and the Oil and Gas Terminals of Hound Point and Breafoot. As part of her duties she is involved in civils projects throughout the river and spend large amounts of time managing engineering project from a marine perspective. The latest project is the construction of the Queensferry Crossing which she has been involved with from the very early stages. She was awarded the Scottish Engineering Incorporation of Hammerman award for my involvement in this project.

Sign up and join us live in Glow TV – Scottish Engineer Special Leaders Award – Ashley Nicholson

If you unable to join us for the live event you can always catch up with the recording at another time – Glow TV’s Watch Again.

Winter Wellbeing⤴

from @ Pedagoo.org

What is Our Winter Wellbeing Calendar all about? Whilst the Christmas period is seen as the time of the year for joy and celebration, what’s often not recognised, is that it can be a particularly tiring and stressful time of the year for school leaders and teachers. The plays and special assemblies are all wonderful […]

Vote with your light switch⤴

from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

Intervision, the 70s Soviet answer to the Eurovision Song Contest, was judge by electricity grid voting: “those watching at home had to turn their lights on when they liked a song and off when they didn’t, with data from the electricity network then being used to allocate points.” [Nick Heady] (Fluxx have been working with National Grid on several projects this year)

Just one of 52 things I learned in 2016 – Fluxx Studio Notes – Medium found via kottke

    Issue importing references from WordPress to Endnote using Academic Blogger’s Toolkit.⤴

    from @ ICT & Education

    I love Academic Blogger’s Toolkit (ABT). It allows me to add references to my WordPress research and reflection blog (which isn’t this one and I don’t have a link to it as it’s for my eyes only—sorry). One particular feature I quite like is the ability to export references I’ve created in Endnote and have them imported into ABT.

    That is, until recently. For some reason, the last update to Endnote has caused it to stop working. To resolve the situation, I sent a Twitter message to the creator of the plug-in, Derek Sifford, via Twitter (@flightmed1). Within a day—a day!—the issue had been reviewed and solved. Now that, ladies and gentleman, is what I call impressive.

    So, if anyone else has the same issue, here’s what to do.

    1. Export as BibTex as text only.
    2. Rename the file extension from .txt to .bib
    3. Import using ABT

    And, again, a huge thanks to Derek. You’ve got a fan for life now, sir.🙂

    Evil Auto Complete?⤴

    from @ John's World Wide Wall Display

    arewomenfw1-600

    There are also evil women. I didn’t go looking for them either. This is what I type: “a-r-e w-o-m-e-n”. And Google offers me just two choices, the first of which is: “Are women evil?” I press return. Yes, they are. Every one of the 10 results “confirms” that they are, including the top one, from a site called sheddingoftheego.com, which is boxed out and highlighted: “Every woman has some degree of prostitute in her. Every woman has a little evil in her… Women don’t love men, they love what they can do for them. It is within reason to say women feel attraction but they cannot love men.”

    from: Google, democracy and the truth about internet search | Technology | The Guardian

    I’ve long been fascinated by google auto completes but never though of deeper implications.

    I read this in the Observer this morning. Thanks to @LillyLyle for digging out the link I couldn’t find (via @IanStuart66)).

    I use google all of the time and do pay attention to the auto completes as they often seem to help in refining a search. Sometimes this is just to avoid suggestions, sometime better. I’d not thought about the darker side.

    On reading the article I first didn’t think that I paid much attention to auto suggestions (like adverts). I cast my mind back to yesterday when I was searching for a way to draw ‘irregular rectangles’ with JavaScript. I didn’t really find what I wanted, but burrowed down several rabbit holes steered by the suggestions.

    I am used to the top google results having some sort of authority. Google a film get IMDB or Wikipedia. This gives pause.

    Featured image captured with LICEcap.

    Running my auto complete script leads to a few possible questions…

    is_google

    • is google your friend?
    • is google evil?
    • is google racist?
    • is google listening to me?
    • is google making us stupid?

      Advent. What is coming?⤴

      from

      Advent. A time to reflect, anticipate, prepare.

      The complexity of my life just now, both personal and professional, is extreme.
      I feel as though I am on the edge of something either very good or completely overwhelming.

      I need courage. I need resilience. I need focus and I need to be able to ignore the dramas and prioritise what really matters.

      As a leader of the life of my school and as a leader of my own life and the life of my family, I need to remember the following:

      • To plant the soles of my feet firmly on the ground and breathe from the pit of my stomach.
      • That this is my life and that it is not waiting for me somewhere in a distant future when I am ‘grown up enough’ or ‘good enough’.
      • That people are complicated and that part of the challenge of life is trying to understand them and work alongside them.
      • That you can’t make everyone like you. But if they don’t, you should reflect on why this is.
      • That life is good and bad. That we have to work together to celebrate and embrace the good and to challenge and minimise the impact of the bad.
      • That education has the power to transform lives.
      • That we must never stop learning and that mistakes teach us as much as successes.
      • That we are both infinitely important and infinitely unimportant.

      And this, from a previous blog:

      If ever I run a school or the world, these will be my non-negotiables:

      Everyone must be willing to self-reflect and learn.

      We don’t shout at others.

      We all get things wrong and need to be able to apologise when we do.

      We are all human and being in a position of authority does not mean you are better than anyone else.

      Everyone needs to take time to see the reality of a situation and not fall into making judgements based on half-truths, prejudice or stereotypes.

      Everyone is worthy of love.

       

       


      Things arent what they’re supposed to be⤴

      from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

      Recently I had the pleasure of working with a group of teachers from another school who were just about to embark on their own journey with practitioner enquiry. I had taken along a couple of teachers so they could give first-hand accounts of practitioner enquiry as class teachers, warts and all. I was essentially the warm up act! My role was to share the big picture regarding practitioner enquiry, explain some of the research behind the approach, explore the process and identify some of the benefits and issues to be considered. I could do that.


      I had never considered myself as a scary person before, but it seems that was what I was being seen as by some of my audience. This was encapsulated by the teacher who articulated her fears. 'This is like being back at university and carrying out research for my degree' she pleaded. 'Where do we find the time to carry out all this research that you suggest we should be doing' she asked. Her reaction was not untypical of others I have received from very busy teachers when I am asked to talk about this approach. I probably need to reconsider the message I am putting across because, as I said to this teacher and have said to others, 'this is not about you becoming a researcher in the way understood by those in higher education. What it is about is you becoming an enquirer into your practice and your impact on learning.'


      Of course, I am not against researchers and recognise the vital role they have to play in education and elsewhere. But researchers are employed to research. Teachers are employed to teach. Researchers are steeped in the process of research and have deep understandings in how to carry this out in a way that is fair, ethical and free from bias. The have a wide range of understanding around research approaches and tools, that they understand deeply and can employ in their work, often developed over many years. Teachers too have a range of skills and experiences that help shape and hone their practice and improve their impact on learning. They do not have the time or the expertise to carry out an in-depth, high quality piece of research, and nor should they be expected to. What they can be expected to do, and be, however is to be professionally curious with dispositions towards enquiring into their practice throughout their careers. I also believe the insights they gain can, and should, be shared with others, but in ways that are manageable and accessible to all.

      Fortunately, to help me exemplify the point, the two teachers with me stepped in to share their experiences of continually enquiring into their practice. Both explained that they too were not researchers, but they had always been reflective practitioners, who were continually trying to develop and grow their practice. They explained that what the adoption of a practitioner enquiry approach had given them was a systematic way of looking at their practice, which was informed by data and evidence. They explained how they incorporated the enquiry process into the everyday activities of their classrooms and how, by keeping the focus small scale, they kept the data collection manageable, but were able to scale up the insights they gained. The colleagues we were working with asked lots of pertinent questions of us all, which we answered honestly and as fully as we could. We must have done something right, as the headteacher of the school we visited, phoned me the next day to tell me how excited the staff were about identifying and starting their own enquiries. She was particularly pleased that the staff who asked the most questions and expressed the most apprehension were just as enthused.

      What this experience re-enforced to myself was that, even though currently there is a lot of focus on practitioner and collaborative enquiry in Scotland, and further afield, there are still many misconceptions about what these approaches actually entail. Perhaps the biggest threat to achieving the impacts we should through practitioner enquiry are misconceptions that then turn in to the 'lethal mutations' Marilyn Cochran Smith cautioned about when in Edinburgh last year. I worry that practitioner enquiry is just seen as another 'thing' to be done, rather than the disposition it needs to be. The trouble with 'things' is they can mean different 'things' to different people.

      Things arent what they’re supposed to be⤴

      from @ School Leadership - A Scottish Perspective

      Recently I had the pleasure of working with a group of teachers from another school who were just about to embark on their own journey with practitioner enquiry. I had taken along a couple of teachers so they could give first-hand accounts of practitioner enquiry as class teachers, warts and all. I was essentially the warm up act! My role was to share the big picture regarding practitioner enquiry, explain some of the research behind the approach, explore the process and identify some of the benefits and issues to be considered. I could do that.


      I had never considered myself as a scary person before, but it seems that was what I was being seen as by some of my audience. This was encapsulated by the teacher who articulated her fears. 'This is like being back at university and carrying out research for my degree' she pleaded. 'Where do we find the time to carry out all this research that you suggest we should be doing' she asked. Her reaction was not untypical of others I have received from very busy teachers when I am asked to talk about this approach. I probably need to reconsider the message I am putting across because, as I said to this teacher and have said to others, 'this is not about you becoming a researcher in the way understood by those in higher education. What it is about is you becoming an enquirer into your practice and your impact on learning.'


      Of course, I am not against researchers and recognise the vital role they have to play in education and elsewhere. But researchers are employed to research. Teachers are employed to teach. Researchers are steeped in the process of research and have deep understandings in how to carry this out in a way that is fair, ethical and free from bias. The have a wide range of understanding around research approaches and tools, that they understand deeply and can employ in their work, often developed over many years. Teachers too have a range of skills and experiences that help shape and hone their practice and improve their impact on learning. They do not have the time or the expertise to carry out an in-depth, high quality piece of research, and nor should they be expected to. What they can be expected to do, and be, however is to be professionally curious with dispositions towards enquiring into their practice throughout their careers. I also believe the insights they gain can, and should, be shared with others, but in ways that are manageable and accessible to all.

      Fortunately, to help me exemplify the point, the two teachers with me stepped in to share their experiences of continually enquiring into their practice. Both explained that they too were not researchers, but they had always been reflective practitioners, who were continually trying to develop and grow their practice. They explained that what the adoption of a practitioner enquiry approach had given them was a systematic way of looking at their practice, which was informed by data and evidence. They explained how they incorporated the enquiry process into the everyday activities of their classrooms and how, by keeping the focus small scale, they kept the data collection manageable, but were able to scale up the insights they gained. The colleagues we were working with asked lots of pertinent questions of us all, which we answered honestly and as fully as we could. We must have done something right, as the headteacher of the school we visited, phoned me the next day to tell me how excited the staff were about identifying and starting their own enquiries. She was particularly pleased that the staff who asked the most questions and expressed the most apprehension were just as enthused.

      What this experience re-enforced to myself was that, even though currently there is a lot of focus on practitioner and collaborative enquiry in Scotland, and further afield, there are still many misconceptions about what these approaches actually entail. Perhaps the biggest threat to achieving the impacts we should through practitioner enquiry are misconceptions that then turn in to the 'lethal mutations' Marilyn Cochran Smith cautioned about when in Edinburgh last year. I worry that practitioner enquiry is just seen as another 'thing' to be done, rather than the disposition it needs to be. The trouble with 'things' is they can mean different 'things' to different people.